Types of Meniscal Repair for Tears & Injuries

The meniscus is a very important structure. It distributes our weight evenly across the knee joint and without it; the weight would be uneven and will lead to arthritis of our knee joint. Injuries to the meniscus are especially common in young patients who are athletically active below the age of 25 years, especially those who are involved in high pivoting sports such as soccer and basketball.

Treatment for meniscal tears would depend on the type of tear, how big it is and where is it at. If the tear is located at the outer edge, a meniscus repair surgery will be carried out as there is a rich supply of blood which will heal on its own after surgery. However if the tear is located at the central portion to the inner portion, meniscus repair will not be performed as the area lacks blood supply and without blood, there are no nutrients. As a result, the tears will not heal and are usually trimmed away during surgery.

Taking into consideration factors such as age, activity level and type of tear, the doctor is able to advise on the most appropriate form of treatment.

Non Surgical Treatment

If the size of the tear is small and is at the outer side of the meniscus, repair surgery is not required. If the knee is still stable, non surgical treatment is the best option.

RICE is the easiest and most effective treatment for most injuries.

Rest. Stop whatever activities you are doing immediately especially the one that caused the injury. Crutches may be used to relieve weight on the injured leg.

Ice. Usage of ice packs for 20 minutes a time throughout the day will relieve swelling and pain.

Compression. An elastic compression sleeve is worn to prevent blood loss and to decrease the swelling.

Elevation. Keeping the injured leg above the heart level when at rest reduces swelling.

Non steroid anti inflammatory medicine.

The doctor will also prescribe anti inflammatory medication such as aspirin and ibuprofen to reduce pain as well as swelling.

Surgical treatment

If non surgical treatment fails, arthroscopic surgery is the only way out. Knee arthroscopy surgery is one of the most commonly performed surgery in the world and small incisions will be made on the knee to place a miniature camera in it to allow a clear view of the insides. Small surgical instruments will be placed in the other incisions and the tear is either trimmed or repaired depending on the type of tear and the severity.

Meniscal tears are common knee injuries. With the proper care and treatment given, patients will have little problem returning back to pre-injury capabilities.

Symptoms of Rotator Cuff Repair Injury

A rotator cuff tear is a common injury suffered by many and it causes pain and disability among adults. It will not only weaken your shoulder but will also hinder your day to day activities, such as wearing your clothes, brushing your teeth and combing your hair. The rotator cuff is a group of tendons that are joined together, surrounding the front, back and top of your shoulder joint connected to each other. When one or more muscles are torn, the tendons are detached from the humerus and they start to fray. As time passes, the tendon can entirely tear either on its own or during activities that exert huge load on the shoulders.

The most common symptom experienced by many is aching at the top and front of the shoulder. The pain is significantly higher when the arm is lifted overhead. Often, the patient is unable to have a good rest at night as the pain gets worse at night. Some patients may experience weakness in the injured arm and in a worst case scenario; the entire arm cannot be lifted at all.

When patients experience inability to lift their arm above their shoulder, it is normally due to their supraspinatus tendon rubbing against the under portion of their shoulder blade known as the Acromium. It can be acute and it can also be a gradual pain depending on the initial injury. Swelling and inflammation will be observed and the muscles in the rotator cuff will be weakened as a result.

Overuse of the shoulder causes bursitis or tendonitis which is also known as impingement. Impingement will cause the tissues below the acromioclavicular joint to be rubbing against the bone, causing irritation and pain. Normally the doctor will prescribe pain killers or cortisone injections. However if all fails, an arthroscopic acromioplasty or shoulder acromioplasty will be carried out.

As the surface of our acromion can be mis-shaped, bone spurs might develop. By jutting further down when the tendons are, it will cause much pain too the patient in the injured shoulder. The surgeon can reshape the acromion through arthroscopy, a minimal invasive surgery method or through open shoulder surgery.

Gentle exercises to obtain back full range of motion will start the day after the surgery and patients are advised to stop using the arm sling in the shortest possible time. The sutures will be removed a week after surgery and strengthening exercise will be taught to them. It will take approximately 3 months for the shoulder to recover fully.

Symptoms of Rotator Cuff Repair Injury

A rotator cuff tear is a common injury suffered by many and it causes pain and disability among adults. It will not only weaken your shoulder but will also hinder your day to day activities, such as wearing your clothes, brushing your teeth and combing your hair. The rotator cuff is a group of tendons that are joined together, surrounding the front, back and top of your shoulder joint connected to each other. When one or more muscles are torn, the tendons are detached from the humerus and they start to fray. As time passes, the tendon can entirely tear either on its own or during activities that exert huge load on the shoulders.

The most common symptom experienced by many is aching at the top and front of the shoulder. The pain is significantly higher when the arm is lifted overhead. Often, the patient is unable to have a good rest at night as the pain gets worse at night. Some patients may experience weakness in the injured arm and in a worst case scenario; the entire arm cannot be lifted at all.

When patients experience inability to lift their arm above their shoulder, it is normally due to their supraspinatus tendon rubbing against the under portion of their shoulder blade known as the Acromium. It can be acute and it can also be a gradual pain depending on the initial injury. Swelling and inflammation will be observed and the muscles in the rotator cuff will be weakened as a result.

Overuse of the shoulder causes bursitis or tendonitis which is also known as impingement. Impingement will cause the tissues below the acromioclavicular joint to be rubbing against the bone, causing irritation and pain. Normally the doctor will prescribe pain killers or cortisone injections. However if all fails, an arthroscopic acromioplasty or shoulder acromioplasty will be carried out.

As the surface of our acromion can be mis-shaped, bone spurs might develop. By jutting further down when the tendons are, it will cause much pain too the patient in the injured shoulder. The surgeon can reshape the acromion through arthroscopy, a minimal invasive surgery method or through open shoulder surgery.

Gentle exercises to obtain back full range of motion will start the day after the surgery and patients are advised to stop using the arm sling in the shortest possible time. The sutures will be removed a week after surgery and strengthening exercise will be taught to them. It will take approximately 3 months for the shoulder to recover fully.

The Recovery Process After Rotator Cuff Surgery

Shoulder pain is a common problem experienced by many people, with a tear in the rotator cuff the most common reason for it. They are extremely painful and restrict your movement greatly. The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons which comprises of four muscles and they hold your arm in a ball and socket joint, which allows your shoulder to rotate around and move with ease. The tendons can be torn through injuries. Rotator cuff surgery is the most commonly done procedures around the world, with over 250000 done in the United States of America annually.

After the surgery has completed, the patient will be taken to a recovery room for a couple of hours. The injured arm will be in a protective sling or even a shoulder immobilizer to prevent any movements. Depending on the type of surgery, arthroscopic surgery patients will be discharged on the same day while open surgery patients will need to be warded for a couple of days.

A physiotherapist will meet up with the patient before discharge and he will teach the patient a set of exercises that are designed to regain the flexibility, range of motion and strength in the injured shoulder. The exercises can be done at the comfort of your own home. Not only will physical therapy exercises be taught, the patient will also be educated on how to prevent re-injuring the shoulders.

Back at the comfort of their own home, it is crucial to perform the physical therapy exercises taught by the physiotherapist for 5 times a day.  Patients should attempt to get back their full range of motion as soon as possible to prevent the formation of scar tissues. If scar tissues are formed, the scarring might possibly cause the whole shoulder to stiffen which will result in huge discomfort and even limit the activities the shoulder can conduct in future. Swelling might be observed as well. They will normally go away if the arms are held in an elevated position and is nothing serious.

The first 12 weeks after surgery are the most important period. Physical exercises must be conducted regularly to regain the full range of motion and prevent the formation of scar tissues. It is of utmost importance not to lift the injured arm away from the body and do not exert any strength on it. Whenever throughout the day, the arm must always be kept inside a protective sling and it is only allowed to be removed which exercising or showering. Do not attempt to drive during the first 6 weeks after surgery.

Full recovery takes roughly 6 months and the first 12 weeks are of most importance. Do the exercises as prescribed by the physiotherapist and this will kick start the healing process

We offer professional help in the areas of diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation for rotator cuff injury and shoulder pain.

Psoriatic Arthritis Symptoms for Joint Arthritis Condition

Psoriatic arthritis causes pain in the joints, stiffness and swelling in people suffering from psoriasis. Psoriasis is a chronic skin condition which causes the skin to be covered in patches of thick red inflamed silvery scales. It affects both sexes equally and most sufferers develop psoriatic arthritis followed by the arthritis symptoms.

The nature of symptoms for psoriatic arthritis depends on the type, but they are more or less similar to each other. Generally, patients will suffer pain, stiffness and tenderness at their joint areas in more than one place. Their range of motion is also significantly decreased and the pain amplifies when there are attempt to move the joints. The pain is significantly higher in the morning but subsides throughout the day.

There are 5 different types of psoriatic arthritis with each having their own unique symptoms:

Distal Interphalangeal Predominant

Patients will tend to feel tenderness and pain only in the last joints of their fingers and toes as only the distal interphalangeal joints are affected.

Asymmetrical Arthritis

Only 2 or 3 joints are affected and they are individual and not in pairs. Any joints in the body can feel pain and are often red and warm to touch.

Symmetrical Polyarthritis

Joint swelling in pairs is observed on both sides of the body, such as both elbows for example.

Spondylitis, or Psoriatic Spondyloarthritis

Joints in the spine will be inflamed and is a serious condition that will cause deformity and changes in the posture as well. Inflammation, tenderness and stiffness of the joints in both the back and neck will occur and the ligaments might be affected.

Arthritis Mutilans

The bones and cartilage in the joints will be destroyed and deformed and flares in the skin will be observed. It will affect the small joints in the fingers and toes nearest to the nail and lower back and neck pain can be observed.

The symptoms vary according but the common signs and symptoms are:

 

  • Uncomfortableness, inflexibility, tenderness and swelling in one or more joints.
  • Range of motions in joints are greatly reduced.Re
  • Stiffness in the morning.
  • Lower back experiencing stiffness and inflammation.
  • Swelling in the smaller joints of the toes and fingers that are closest to the nail.
  • Pitting of nails.
  • Fingernails or toenails are detaching.
  • Tenderness, pain, or swelling where tendons and ligaments attach to the bone
  • Eye inflammation

Types of surgical techniques to stabilize an ankle with chronic sprains

Question

What kinds of surgical techniques are used to stabilize an ankle with chronic sprains?

Answer

There are many surgical techniques, but they basically fall into two groups. One is anatomic reconstruction. With this technique, surgeons use the original ankle ligaments to repair the ankle. The other technique is called tenodesis. In this procedure, surgeons reconstruct the ankle ligament using tendon from elsewhere in the body, such as the lower leg. Surgeons attach the transplanted tissue to bones in the ankle joint.

Researchers evaluated the results of both kinds of surgery in a group of athletes. For these patients, anatomic reconstruction resulted in better ankle movement and stability. It also led to fewer degenerative changes in the joint. Compared to tenodesis, anatomic reconstruction more often gave a good or excellent result. For athletes and other active patients, researchers think anatomic reconstruction is the method of choice.

Could Knee Injury Cause Knee Arthritis?

Question

I twisted and sprained my knee badly back in high school. I read once that having a bad knee injury can cause knee arthritis later in life. If so, I’m wondering if there is anything I can do now so I don’t end up with knee arthritis.

Answer

People who have had a significant injury of the knee joint may have a greater risk for knee arthritis in later years. Prevention includes safe exercises that focus on improving and maintaining joint movement and muscle strength.

Stay active in a low-impact conditioning program, such as walking. To help reduce shock with day-to-day activities, wear supportive shoes, and consider the addition of an insole to help absorb shock. Walk on soft surfaces when possible, and avoid standing and walking for long periods on hard surfaces, such as cement. You might also consider choosing sport and recreational activities that don’t require cutting, jumping, and quick starts and stops. The time and effort you invest now to improve the health of your knee and avoid future problems are worth it.

Am I Able to Gain my Balance Back, after a Ligament surgery?

Question:

I tore my anterior cruciate ligament(ACL) playing basketball, and I’m having surgery to reconstruct the ligament. Can I expect to get my balance back?

Answer:

The outlook is good. Researchers recently observed patients who had ACL surgery followed by five weeks of wearing either a cast or a brace. Patients also had six to eight months of therapy to get their agility and strength back. Three years after surgery, these patients did as well on tests of balance as people who didn’t have ACL problems. Patients who had ACL surgery had slightly slower reaction times, but in general their balance was just as good.

Ask your doctor or physical therapist about ways to manage your knee after surgery to ensure a full recovery.

How successful is surgery for shin splints?

Question: 

How successful is surgery for shin splints?

Answer:

There is no clear-cut answer to this question. Although some people are helped by surgery for shin splints, surgery is not always successful. Pain is often relieved without surgery.

Other treatment options can be tried before surgery. These include the use of orthotic inserts. Orthotics help stabilize the ankle joint and keep the foot from rolling inward. They can also be designed to help absorb shock. Training for strength, agility, and flexibility before and during the sports season also reduces shin splints among athletes.

Will I develop arthritis if i had a fall during my secondary school days?

Question:

I fell and hurt my knee pretty bad back in high school. Will I be more likely to develop arthritis in my knee as I get older?

Answer:

Just because you injured your knee does not mean you’ll have problems as you age. However, significant injuries to the knee and hip have been found to increase the risk of osteoarthritis in these joints. Researchers tracked 1,337 medical students over a period of nearly twenty years to see whether people with knee or hip injuries would eventually have problems with osteoarthritis. They found that a higher percentage of people with injuries of the hip or knee in the younger years ended up having arthritis in the joint they had injured. People who are at risk because of an earlier injury should consider seeking advice on ways to improve the health of their joint and to prevent problems in the future.