Jumper’s Knee (Patellar Tendonitis): Symptoms & Treatments

Whether you like to run for sport or just for fun, there is an injury that accounts for just less than 5% of all running injuries. Patellar Tendonitis, or jumper’s knee, is an injury to the patellar tendon that connects you knee to your tibia bone. This area takes on a huge load in any type of running or jumping movements and it can become injured quite quickly. This typically happens in men more than women but both are susceptible to this type of injury.

Symptoms

There are a few different stages of jumper’s knee and depending on what stage you’re in will determine the symptoms you are showing. The first stage of patellar tendonitis is classified as pain after a certain exercise or movement. There is no true stopping of movement in this stage, just pain in the knee once the activity is finished.

Those who are in stage two of the injury will deal with pain both after and during the activity they are participating in. In stage three, however, the pain is all the time and the activities that can be participated in are limited. The final stage of this injure is a tendon rupture and that requires the use of surgery to repair the knee injury.

Treatment Options

For those who are dealing with stage one of jumper’s knee, simple ice therapy typically does the trick. Make sure to use ice packs or even ice massage after the activity to help reduce inflammation and pain. Those in stage two will typically have physical therapy due to the pain interrupting normal everyday life. They may lose sleep because of the pain and by working with a physical therapist they can reduce the pain and get back to normalcy.

Those who have reached a stage three injury should also work with the treatments above while adding in significant rest. This can be a period of three to six weeks depending on the injury and how physical therapy is working. You can also take prescription medication in any of these stages to help relieve pain if your doctor has prescribed it.

Strengthening exercises and being careful about alternating your exercise regimen can help to prevent these patellar tendonitis injuries. They can cause severe pain in any level of the injury and it is imperative not to push your body too far. Be sure to talk with your doctor if you’re experiencing continuous pain during or after activity to rule out jumper’s knee.

 

Top 4 Badminton Overuse Injuries

Overuse injuries are commonly experienced by badminton players. Due to overtraining and improper use of techniques, stress is constantly impacted on the same parts of the body, leading to tendon tears and chronic pain over time if left untreated. The pain comes gradually and may not affect the performance of players immediately. As such, many ignore the symptoms until the condition worsens.

  1. Tennis Elbow

Also called the Lateral Epicondylitis, Tennis Elbow is caused by the repetitive motion of using backhand to hit the shuttlecock. Patients would feel pain in the elbow and arm, especially when raising the hand or gripping an object. Other causes that contribute to the injury could also be the high tension of the strings and unsuitable racket grip size. While the backhand move is necessary for all racket sports, it is important to use the correct techniques and warm up before every training session.

  • Jumper’s Knee

Another name for Jumper’s Knee is Patellar Tendonitis. It is called the Jumper’s Knee as the condition is usually caused by the action of jumping during sports, with the impact striking the knees upon landing. Patients complain of pain and aching on the front side of the knee though they have never had an injury in the area before. It may not be felt significantly in the early stages but eventually, if left untreated, can result in tendon rupture.

  • Golfer’s Elbow

Golfer’s Elbow, or Medial Epicondylitis, is the damage to the elbow muscles and tendons that control the wrist and fingers. It is caused by the repetitive flicking motion of the wrist required in badminton. Usually due to compensation from inadequate use of arm strength, the force used with the wrist might be more than the muscles can take. Patients would feel pain and tenderness on the inside of the elbow and along the forearm, with stiffness and difficulty to grip. Tape and elbow guard can be worn to give more support to the arm. However, it is best to stop all activities and allow the arm to rest once pain is felt during or after training.

  • Shoulder Injuries

One common shoulder injury is a shoulder strain. Due to the nature of the sport which requires impactful swinging of the shoulders, the rotator cuff of the shoulder is often strained or damaged over time. Symptoms to look out for are pain and stiffness that gradually worsens with activity. Injury could be avoided by using the correct techniques and getting plenty of rest to allow the muscles to recover.