Finger Dislocation: Causes, Symptoms and Treatments

A variety of different things can cause a finger injury. You can bruise it or cut it when you’re in the kitchen, or even smash it when working out in the shop. But, a finger dislocation is a totally different type of injury. Take a look at the causes, symptoms, and your treatment options should you find yourself in the position of having a dislocated finger.

Causes

The cause of a finger dislocation is either “jamming” your finger on the end of the fingertip with an excessive force, or it can be caused if your finger becomes overextended in a particular direction. This can happen due to you experiencing a fall and landing wrong on the outstretched hand when you’re trying to catch yourself. It can happen when you’re playing a variety of sports such as basketball or baseball and having the ball jam your finger. You may also get your finger caught in either sports equipment or other type of equipment and pull your finger out of its normal placement.

Symptoms of Finger Dislocation

Typically, when you have dislocated your finger you’re going to know it. It’s not a subtle injury that you may question what happened. Your finger will look either crooked or bent in an odd shape and there will be pain and swelling as well. You may also experience numbness or tingling in the finger and the finger will start to look pales as well. There’s also a chance, depending on how severe the finger injury is, that it will break the skin when you have a finger dislocation.

Treatment Options

Any sign of a finger dislocation calls for a trip to the doctor or ER. You need to have the finger put back into place before any permanent damage is done. The longer you wait to receive treatment, it can make it more difficult to put it back into place or can cause irreversible damage.

Before you get to the doctor, make sure to remove any items of jewelry from the injured finger if you have any on. Travel to the doctor’s office with ice on your hand. Once you arrive at the doctor they will most likely give you a local anesthetic or some pain medications via IV or mouth so that the doctor can put your finger back into its proper place. Once that has happened you’ll receive either a splint or have your finger taped to the healthy one next to it. This will help it to heal and prevent any chance of it slipping back out of place during healing.

Leave a Reply