Bunionette Deformity Correction

If you’ve been dealing with pain in your foot due to a bunionette, you’re probably wondering what can be done to reduce or get rid of the pain. Perhaps your pain has gotten worse or you’re just starting to deal with pain as the bunion is growing. When you’re looking into bunionette deformity correction, you may think that there’s no hope. However, in some cases the bunionette surgery can work wonderfully and reduce/completely get rid of your pain and issues you’re having. Here are some things to think about when looking into correction and surgery processes.

What is a bunionette?

Basically, this is a bone growth on the outside of your foot near your pinky, or 5th, toe. While you may not even notice a bump or growth there to start with, over time as the bunionette continues to grow, it can become quite painful. It’s also called a Tailor’s bunion in some circles.

Some people can do well with the bunionette deformity correction without surgery. Things such as getting shoes that are roomier on their feet, padding that area to protect it from rubbing on the shoes, and even custom inserts to help protect the area are tried. While this may help some, it doesn’t always work and the next step would be a surgical procedure.

What should you know about the surgery?

First, those who may benefit from surgery are the patients who have not gained any relief from the other methods already tried. Surgery is not the first line of defense for this ailment but it can relieve pain in those who do not receive relief in any other form.

This is an outpatient procedure so unless there are other complications to deal with, you’re going to be in and out in the same day. The surgeon you work with will go into detail on their plans, but generally the bunionette surgery entails the tissue on your outside of the foot and sometimes an incision is made into the bone itself. There are several different methods to help rid the foot of the bony growth and straighten out the curve that may have developed. Once your surgeon has looked over you records, they will go over the best options.

People who have a cut on their foot, lost circulation in the foot area, or that have an infection in the foot will not be good candidates for the procedure. Your doctor will advise the best route of dealing with the bunionette deformity correction to help relieve your pain and get you walking again.

If you have the surgery you can expect recovery to vary depending on your specific case. Most people are in a boot or splint to help the foot stay in place for anywhere from three weeks up to twelve. Be sure to follow all of your doctor’s orders afterwards so that you can make sure it heals properly and you can get back to business as usual.

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