Bunionette Deformity Correction

If you’ve been dealing with pain in your foot due to a bunionette, you’re probably wondering what can be done to reduce or get rid of the pain. Perhaps your pain has gotten worse or you’re just starting to deal with pain as the bunion is growing. When you’re looking into bunionette deformity correction, you may think that there’s no hope. However, in some cases the bunionette surgery can work wonderfully and reduce/completely get rid of your pain and issues you’re having. Here are some things to think about when looking into correction and surgery processes.

What is a bunionette?

Basically, this is a bone growth on the outside of your foot near your pinky, or 5th, toe. While you may not even notice a bump or growth there to start with, over time as the bunionette continues to grow, it can become quite painful. It’s also called a Tailor’s bunion in some circles.

Some people can do well with the bunionette deformity correction without surgery. Things such as getting shoes that are roomier on their feet, padding that area to protect it from rubbing on the shoes, and even custom inserts to help protect the area are tried. While this may help some, it doesn’t always work and the next step would be a surgical procedure.

What should you know about the surgery?

First, those who may benefit from surgery are the patients who have not gained any relief from the other methods already tried. Surgery is not the first line of defense for this ailment but it can relieve pain in those who do not receive relief in any other form.

This is an outpatient procedure so unless there are other complications to deal with, you’re going to be in and out in the same day. The surgeon you work with will go into detail on their plans, but generally the bunionette surgery entails the tissue on your outside of the foot and sometimes an incision is made into the bone itself. There are several different methods to help rid the foot of the bony growth and straighten out the curve that may have developed. Once your surgeon has looked over you records, they will go over the best options.

People who have a cut on their foot, lost circulation in the foot area, or that have an infection in the foot will not be good candidates for the procedure. Your doctor will advise the best route of dealing with the bunionette deformity correction to help relieve your pain and get you walking again.

If you have the surgery you can expect recovery to vary depending on your specific case. Most people are in a boot or splint to help the foot stay in place for anywhere from three weeks up to twelve. Be sure to follow all of your doctor’s orders afterwards so that you can make sure it heals properly and you can get back to business as usual.

All About Ankle Ligament Surgery

Pain in your ankles can arise from a variety of different things. Perhaps you’re dealing with an injury from playing your favorite sport or maybe due to a fall that you took. Maybe you’re dealing with arthritis in the joints or you’ve had a more significant injury due to a car accident. Whatever the case may be, when it comes to the ligaments in your ankles, sometimes you can get away with lots of rest and a few other topical methods. Other times you may need ankle ligament surgery to correct the issue at hand. Here are a few things to know about this type of procedure and the different options that you have.

Ankle Ligament Surgery

This procedure is what your physician will do to help repair a torn ligament due to an injury to the ankle area. This is used to help treat your ankle when you’ve had a serious sprain or if you’ve had instability in the ankle due to an injury. This is typically a procedure done within a day so you’ll be back home before you know it. You’ll leave in a cast that comes up to your knee and given some directions for follow up and how to handle the ankle itself.

Lateral Ankle Ligament Reconstruction

Also known as the Brostrom procedure, this is where the physician will repair one or more of your ligaments in the ankle. It is because you’ve had multiple sprains in your ankle, your ankle has become weak over time due to injury, or there may be a defect in the ankle area that this can help to correct.

If you’ve dealt with problems such as hindfoot Varus, midfoot cavus, or a disease such as Ehlers-Danlos where your ligaments are very loose, this is the surgery that can help you to get some stability back in your ankles. There are some risks involved but you should consult with your physician on your personal risks.

The procedure will involve you being put under general anesthesia or just some local anesthesia depending on the severity of the surgery. The surgeon makes a small incision and uses instruments to carry out the procedure if the surgery is a minimally invasive one. In some situations, the doctor will need to make a longer incision for severe cases.

The doctor will then go in and either shorten your ligaments, remove them, and attach your ankle differently to help give it stability, or do other constructive means to help give the ankle the strength it needs. Lateral ankle ligament reconstruction and ankle ligament surgery can assist you in getting back on your feet. Once you’ve gone through the period of about six weeks after surgery, you can start to bear weight on your ankle and getting back to life.

Achilles Tendinitis: Causes, Symptoms, & Treatments

Have you noticed when you’re walking or exercising that you have pain on the back of your lower leg down near the heel of your foot? If so you could be dealing with Achilles tendinitis. This condition is common for those who overuse the foot or after years of walking/running or exercising. This is a degenerative condition that can come on with age or if you’ve injured your leg. Take a look at what causes Achilles tendinitis and what the symptoms and treatment options you have available.

Causes

There are two types of this tendinitis, noninsertional and insertional. In the first type, it is common in those of the younger generation that are more active and it affects the middle of the tendon. This is where the fibers in the middle of the tendon have begun to breakdown after being torn.

Insertional Achilles Tendinitis affects the lower portion of the tendon itself and can happen to anyone at any age. Once the tendons have started to break or have been damaged, they can begin to calcify and become hard. This can also lead to bone spurs in the area as well.

The basic cause of this issue is repetitive stress to the area itself. This can happen because someone decides to push their body farther than they were ready to go. If you have very tight calf muscles and then begin an aggressive program of exercise, you can end up with this type of injury as well.

Symptoms

The symptoms of Achilles Tendinitis include things such as:

  • Severe pain in the area the day after you’ve done your exercise program
  • Presence of bone spurs
  • Experiencing pain along the tendon when you’re exercising or using the ankle area a lot
  • If you notice a thickening of the area
  • Swelling that does not go away

Treatment Options

Once you know that this type of tendinitis is what is causing your pain, there are several things you can try. Anti-inflammatory medications can help to reduce the swelling, as well as icing the area to relieve the pain and puffiness. Be sure to get plenty of rest and get off your ankle for an extended period of time to allow the tendon to heal and relax.

Reduce the amount of stress put on your tendon by doing calf stretches each day. Physical therapy and learning how to strengthen the area as well can help you to relieve the pain. Injections and shoe lifts can also help to reduce the pain in the area.

Finally, there are surgical options that should be sought as a last resort to your tendonitis. Discuss these options with your doctor to find out what is right for your situation.

What is Ankle Arthrodesis (Ankle Fusion)?

Dealing with pain is never a good thing but sometimes that pain can make it hard to do everyday chores. Something as simple as walking to the mailbox or even your kitchen can become quite difficult to do. This could be because of your ankle and an injury or arthritis that has taken over the ankle joint. When that happens you can consider a procedure called ankle arthrodesis, or ankle fusion, to help get the movement back that you’re used to.

What is ankle arthrodesis?

This procedure, commonly known as ankle fusion, is only completed when your ankle joint has been completely worn down. This could be due to a variety of things including a severe ankle fracture or degenerative arthritis in the joint itself. After you’ve injured the ankle, several years down the road, it can wear out the joint and it can become quite difficult to move it as you have. This procedure basically removes the joint and allows your tibia to grow together with your footbone. That will remove the joint completely and allow your pain to subside.

What should you expect with this procedure?

Before the surgery, you and your doctor will decide if this procedure is right for you. The ankle fusion is a great choice for those who are younger and are very active as it will not wear out like an ankle joint replacement could. Once you’ve been cleared for surgery your doctor will discuss with you whether an open procedure or arthroscopic procedure is best in your situation. They will also warn you of any risks and answer any questions you may have.

What about after surgery?

You will leave the hospital in a cast and in two weeks that one will be changed to a shorter cast. You cannot put weight on your ankle itself until you’re sure that the bones are fusing properly as they should be. When you have this ankle fusion procedure, it could take up to 12-weeks afterwards for that to be certain. For the best reduction of pain after ankle arthrodesis, it is advised that you keep your ankle elevated about your heart and propped up on pillows to reduce the swelling and throbbing.

Be prepared that you will have rehabilitation to go through and running “normally” will not be possible in the future. However, with the inserts available for your shoes and with rehab, you can begin to walk with a normal gait as you did before.

If you’re dealing with a large amount of pain due to arthritis or injury, an ankle fusion may be your ticket to relief. Consult with your physician to be sure you know the ins and outs of this procedure and to help decide if it’s the route to go for you.

What is Total Ankle Arthroplasty (Total Ankle Replacement)?

Suffering from pain when you’re trying to move can lead to less movement on your part. When you’re trying to stay in shape, get in shape, or just keep mobile, pain can put a stop to all of those. Ankle pain can cause you to not want to leave your home or being reduce to having to have assistance when walking. Pain from arthritis can most times be tolerated but when it progresses it can leave you dealing with more pain than you can handle.

How can you deal with this type of pain? How can you keep living life as you want to live it pain free and on your terms? There is a procedure called a total ankle arthroplasty that can offer some light at the end of your tunnel. Discover what this total ankle replacement is and who it might help.

What is a Total Ankle Replacement?

Total Ankle Arthroplasty, or commonly known as TAA, is a total replacement of the ankle joint area. This is used when there is significant arthritis in the joint due to age or sometimes a previous injury such as breaking the ankle. When you’re suffering from arthritis in the ankle, it can lead to deformation of the joint area, pain, and loss of cartilage.

The procedure is performed by an orthopedic surgeon and the entire goal of this process is to allow you to walk and move your ankle with no pain and better movement. The surgeon will inform you on when it is best to have the procedure for your specific case. Not all cases are alike and some may benefit from this total ankle replacement while others may need to put the surgery off.

There are some cases where TAA is not recommended such as those who have had infections in the joint area, neuropathy in the lower limbs, or in cases where dead bone is attached to the ankle area. These would not be good viable cases for the TAA as an option.

What Happens After Surgery?

After you have the total ankle replacement surgery, you’ll have a time where you do not need to put weight on the ankle. This will allow the ankle to completely heal and the joint to set in place as it should. You should use crutches to assist you in walking and keeping off the foot as much as you can. You’ll probably be placed in a type of cast or boot to help keep it stable and in place.

Talk with your orthopedic surgeon to find out if you’re the perfect candidate for total ankle arthroplasty today and get back to living life on your terms.

Types of Push Up Injuries and Prevention Tips

Trying to get in new exercise routines can be exciting but also dangerous if you’re not sure of the prevention tips you need to keep injury at bay. One of the easiest exercises to do to build your upper body is a push up. However, push up injuries can cause you to be in a lot of pain and reduce the exercise routine you’re wanting to do. It can also stop your progress if you’re having to recuperate. Here are a few of the common injuries seen with this type of exercise and also some push up injury prevention tips you can use to protect yourself.

Common Push Up Injuries

When you’re doing a push up there are a few places you can typically experience injury and pain if not done properly. One of those places is in your wrist. If you have a previous injury or your wrists are not strong enough, you can experience pain and discomfort in the wrist area.

Other areas that can be injured during your push up exercises include the rotator cuff in your shoulder, chest injuries, injuries to your back and elbows as well.

Prevention Tips

Doing a push up properly will help you to prevent any injury during the popular exercise. Make sure that your position and method of doing the specific exercise is correct. Incorrect positioning of your hands, shoulders, and elbows are key factors in push up injuries. When you’re not positioned correctly, you can end up in a lot of pain and have to restrict your exercise routine.

You must also make sure your back is aligned properly during the exercise itself. If you let your body hang to low when pushing up, you can strain your lower back area. Keeping your back straight and aligned over top of your arms will help to prevent that.

Make sure that your hand positioning is not turned out or in and that you are not spread too far apart with your arms. This can cause injury to your wrists and elbows, and possibly your shoulders if not done correctly.

Be sure that when you’re doing push ups that you are performing them in slow steady motions. You do not want to jerk back up and down as this can cause push up injuries as well. Be sure that you’re keeping the proper positioning and keeping your movements smooth and steady.

Push up injuries can be quite often and can take you down for several weeks if you’re not careful. Be sure to follow these push up injury prevention tips above to keep your exercise routine moving forward.

Types of Lower Back Pain (Lumbago)

Back pain is something that no one wants to deal with; however, many people deal with it daily. Lower back pain can be caused by a variety of different scenarios ranging from a pulled muscle to something more involved such as a slipped disc or degenerative disc disease. Understanding low back pain, or lumbago as it is sometimes called, is easier to do when you know what you’re dealing with. Check out the different types of lower back pain and what they are caused by. Learning the signs and symptoms may help you to find a diagnosis quicker rather than later.

Sciatica Back Pain

Many people suffer from this type of pain where the sciatic nerve is being compressed. It causes pain in the lower back that shoots down the leg when the area is aggravated. It can cause shooting pain when you try to stand up or change positions, is worse when sitting down, and can cause weakness in your leg or foot of the affected nerve. This lower back pain needs to be seen by a doctor as if it is left untreated, it can cause permanent nerve damage.

Nighttime Back Pain

If you’re able to get relief when you lay down from the pain you’re dealing with during the day, most times you can start to heal. Rest is needed and is very crucial for the body’s healing process. However, if you’re dealing with nighttime back pain, laying down to rest can make the pain worse. Lower back pain when you lay down can be caused by things such as arthritis, kidney stones, spinal disease, or degeneration of the spine. Because you cannot rest when you lay down with nighttime pain, you should consider seeing your doctor sooner rather than later. As mentioned, rest is crucial to the healing process and pain when you try to rest could be a sign of a more serious lumbago pain.

Low Back Strain

You can strain your lower back region by doing a variety of things such as sitting in one position for too long, moving heavy objects, or physically exerting yourself over your limits. With a strain in your lower back you may feel things such as stiffness in your back when trying to move about, pain in the thighs or buttocks, and even pain that gets worse whenever you cough or try to bend over. If so, you should consult your doctor as this can be a simple strain or signs of a worse condition.

Lower back pain is not something to just push to the side. If you’re dealing with lumbago, lower back pain, it is best to consult your doctor to rule out anything serious and prevent irreversible nerve damage. You can also learn more about the professional treatment options for back pain here.

Finger Dislocation: Causes, Symptoms and Treatments

A variety of different things can cause a finger injury. You can bruise it or cut it when you’re in the kitchen, or even smash it when working out in the shop. But, a finger dislocation is a totally different type of injury. Take a look at the causes, symptoms, and your treatment options should you find yourself in the position of having a dislocated finger.

Causes

The cause of a finger dislocation is either “jamming” your finger on the end of the fingertip with an excessive force, or it can be caused if your finger becomes overextended in a particular direction. This can happen due to you experiencing a fall and landing wrong on the outstretched hand when you’re trying to catch yourself. It can happen when you’re playing a variety of sports such as basketball or baseball and having the ball jam your finger. You may also get your finger caught in either sports equipment or other type of equipment and pull your finger out of its normal placement.

Symptoms of Finger Dislocation

Typically, when you have dislocated your finger you’re going to know it. It’s not a subtle injury that you may question what happened. Your finger will look either crooked or bent in an odd shape and there will be pain and swelling as well. You may also experience numbness or tingling in the finger and the finger will start to look pales as well. There’s also a chance, depending on how severe the finger injury is, that it will break the skin when you have a finger dislocation.

Treatment Options

Any sign of a finger dislocation calls for a trip to the doctor or ER. You need to have the finger put back into place before any permanent damage is done. The longer you wait to receive treatment, it can make it more difficult to put it back into place or can cause irreversible damage.

Before you get to the doctor, make sure to remove any items of jewelry from the injured finger if you have any on. Travel to the doctor’s office with ice on your hand. Once you arrive at the doctor they will most likely give you a local anesthetic or some pain medications via IV or mouth so that the doctor can put your finger back into its proper place. Once that has happened you’ll receive either a splint or have your finger taped to the healthy one next to it. This will help it to heal and prevent any chance of it slipping back out of place during healing.

What is Referred Shoulder Pain?

Feeling pain is never a good problem to go through. However, sometimes pain in one area of the body can be a sign of an issue in another area. While you may have shoulder pain and you at first think it’s something to do with your arm or shoulder, it could be something called referred shoulder pain instead. It may not have anything to do with the actual location of the pain in your body.

Referred shoulder pain is actually pain that shows up in the shoulder but could be an indication of gallstones, heart blood vessel problems, lung infection such as pneumonia, or a variety of other problems. The pain you’re feeling in your shoulder could be from another area instead of your actual shoulder. If you’re noticing pain in that area and it doesn’t change when you move your arm or neck, it could be referred shoulder pain.

When You’re Having Pain

It is always best to have your doctor check you out when you’re feeling pain, whether it’s in your shoulder or in some other area. Pain is a sign that something is not quite as it should be and should not be ignored.

Shoulder pain can be from an injury to the shoulder such as a fall or sports injury. It can also be caused by something entirely different. Things to look out for include:

  • Pain that is felt not only in the shoulder but in your shoulder blade areas, neck, armpit, or even in the chest
  • Left arm and shoulder pain can be signs of a serious problem such as inflammation around the heart or a heart attack
  • If you’ve had a procedure done recently it could be gas that was used in the process causing the pain
  • Intense pain that comes on quickly
  • Swelling in the area
  • If you have the inability to use your arm or move the shoulder joint

These are signs that you should be watching out for to make sure you seek medical attention when it’s needed. If you’re having shoulder pain and you have shortness of breath or tightening of your chest, call the emergency officials to assist you. It could all be signs that something dangerous is on the horizon.

If you know what your referred shoulder pain is from, such as a recent medical procedure or you’ve had a diagnosis, you can use some of these tips to help with the pain. Be sure to rest the shoulder and use ice to help relieve the inflammation. Over the counter pain relievers can also be a huge help to reduce the pain and swelling.

Myofascial Pain Syndrome (Muscle Pain): Causes, Symptoms & Treatments

Suffering from pain of any type can be difficult to handle. Sometimes the pain may be minor and can be worked through, while other times it can debilitating and hard to handle. One chronic condition that involves muscle pain that many deal with is called Myofascial pain syndrome. This involves inflammation that is in the soft tissues of the body and cause pain in different areas. It could involve one particular muscular area or a group of muscles causing pain. Here are a few things you should know if you’re dealing with muscle pain or if you think you’re dealing with myofascial pain.

Causes and Symptoms

The causes of myofascial pain can be due to an injury or strain of a muscle in the body. It could be due to repetitive motions that injury the muscle groups being used, an excessive strain that is put on the muscle, tendon or even ligaments, or it can be due to inactivity in a group of muscles. This could be due to having an injury to your arm and not being able to move it due to the cast or sling you’re having to wear.

This type of muscle pain provides “trigger” points that are the symptom of the problem. It can produce pain in these specific areas, or it can also produce other problems such as depression, behavioral problems, or fatigue due to the pain the patient is in.

When you’re being examined for myofascial pain, you may have two types of trigger points, active or latent. The active trigger point is very tender when manipulated whereas the latent trigger point can cause problems but isn’t causing them at the time. It is basically lying in wait to cause problems with pain.

Treatment Options

There are several options available to treat this type of muscle pain depending on what you’re dealing with at the time. You can opt for massage therapy to help reduce the trigger points and work out the kinks in the muscles. There’s physical therapy to help you gain movement back in those muscles if you’ve dealt with an injury that restricted your movement. You may also find that trigger point injection therapy works well for you. This is where the doctor will inject either anesthetic, saline, or corticosteroids into the trigger point and make it dormant so that it doesn’t cause pain any more.

One other method that may be used is the “spray and stretch” method. This is where the trigger point is sprayed with a cooling type spray and then it is slowly stretched out.

You can also take anti-inflammatory medications to assist with the pain as well.